Saturday Morning Rounds April 11, 2020 - The 2 key behaviors of personal finance

Posted by BossB, MD on April 11, 2020

What we're reading

As we mentioned last week, a big part of what we do here at BBMD is helping women physicians get their money right 💰

Our real expertise in that area lies in helping you maximize what you earn at work by career planning and negotiating like a pro, but there's so much more to the money game than that. And with the economic uncertainty we're all facing right now, we expect that this topic might be top-of-mind for many of you reading this.

So, we're working on a series of webinars to give you an overview of all the stuff you really need to know and none of the stuff you don't, in one place. Here's what we're thinking of so far:

  • Economics 101 - How the economy and markets work
  • Overview of fundamental personal finance concepts & strategies
  • How to build multiple revenue streams (investments, side-hustles, etc)

As we've been sourcing material for this project, we've been wading through the vast amount of financial content on the interwebs trying to find the diamonds in the rough and share them with you. Here's our second:

Afford Anything by Paula Pant

Afford Anything isn't a book or a video - it's a website, a podcast, and really an entire company run by an incredibly cool person named Paula Pant.

Paula is a valuable resource in this area for many reasons, chief amongst them being that she's really done the work and has receipts to prove it (a rarity in the personal finance thought leader space).

She achieved financial independence and secured her dream life of traveling around the world wherever and whenever she wants at a much younger age than most. Now she shares the lessons she learned getting there, with others.

She does an amazing job of demystifying personal finance topics, grounding what she shares about finances in the knowledge that it's always in service of your personal lifestyle design, and creating content that is entertaining, easy to understand, and realistic to implement. She specializes in real estate investing with a focus on rental property income, but has a pretty solid wide-angle view of the whole personal finance world.

 

One of our favorite lessons of hers is this graphic about what personal finance boils down to, from her intro content:

 

Personal finance really boils down to 2 key behaviors:

  • Maximizing the gap between what you earn (our real specialty lies in helping you maximize this number) and what you spend (this is the focus of many "personal finance experts" who would have you stop drinking Starbucks and eating avocado toast)
  • INVESTING THE DIFFERENCE

Paula keeps everything centered around these behaviors, and her recommendations are simple, focused and actionable - just a few of the many reasons we love her stuff.

Who we're following

Paula Pant (@AffordAnything), of course! She recently contracted and thankfully recovered from Coronavirus, so lately her content has understandably been focused on that.

However, her feed is usually a well-curated treasure trove of interesting and insightful finance content from a myriad of sources (she actually very impressively kept this up throughout her illness), as well as her own content. If you're interested in deepening your understanding of such topics she's one of the best Tweeps (or Instagrammers or emailers or podcasters) you could follow.

BBMD tip of the week

Increasing what you earn is pretty much always more fun than decreasing what you spend, so brainstorm 10 ideas for how you could increase your earnings - bonus points if they'd be a brand new source of revenue for you. Then be sure to have 'em handy for next week's post :)

Quote we're contemplating

"Mind the gap. If I can distill personal finance advice into three words: Mind the gap. Focus on ramping up your income, while keeping your expenses the same or less. That gap will naturally grow wider and wider.” - Paula Pant 

 
 
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PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds April 4, 2020 - How to start making sense of markets

Posted by BossB, MD on April 4, 2020
 

What we're reading

A big part of what we do here at BBMD is helping women physicians get their money right 💰

Our real expertise in that area lies in helping you maximize what you earn at work by career planning and negotiating like a pro, but there's so much more to the money game than that. And with the economic uncertainty we're all facing right now, we expect that this topic might be top-of-mind for many of you reading this.

Sadly, we've got some ground to make up right from the jump because most women lag behind men in financial literacy in the first place.

So, we're working on a webinar (or maybe a series of them) to give you an overview of all the stuff you really need to know and none of the stuff you don't, in one place. Here's what we're thinking of so far:

  • Economics 101 - How the economy and markets work
  • Overview of fundamental personal finance concepts & strategies
  • How to build multiple revenue streams (investments, side-hustles, etc)

As we've been sourcing material for this project, we've been wading through the vast amount of financial content on the interwebs trying to find the diamonds in the rough and share them with you. Here's our first:

How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio (arguably one of the most successful investors and business thinkers of all time):

If you can think of any topics you'd like us to cover or any specific questions on this subject you'd like answered, please let us know!!

Who we're following

While we're on the subject, Ray Dalio has a Twitter (@RayDalio), and it's a pretty great follow if you wanna learn more about this stuff! He has written a couple books about the core principles that drive his decision making and were responsible for his success over the years, and regularly shares little snippets from those with context on how one might apply them to current happenings. In addition to that, he actually engages pretty heavily on the platform, conducting regular AMAs and the like.

BBMD tip of the week

Research whether you or your institution might qualify for one of the many loan & debt relief programs just launched by the government's CARES act.

If so, we recommend you apply ASAP as most of these programs have a strict budget cap - supposedly once they're gone, they're gone.

Quote we're contemplating

Ray Dalio has too many good quotes to pick just one this week, so we're gonna give you 3 from him:

 "I learned that if you work hard and creatively, you can have just about anything you want, but not everything you want. Maturity is the ability to reject good alternatives in order to pursue even better ones.”

“Don’t mistake possibilities for probabilities. Anything is possible. It’s the probabilities that matter. Everything must be weighed in terms of its likelihood and prioritized.”

And especially appropriate right now:
“Most of life’s greatest opportunities come out of moments of struggle; it’s up to you to make the most of these tests of creativity and character.”
 
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PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds March 28, 2020 - Comedic coping pt 4

Posted by BossB, MD on March 28, 2020

What we're reading

For the third weekly installment of our lighthearted, take-a-break-from-the-world-and-celebrate-Women's-History-Month version of this newsletter, we're taking a trip through Crimea, Constantinople, Great Britain, and the origins of modern nursing:

Florence Nightingale Revolutionizes Nursing (feat. Minka Kelly) - Drunk History:

 

Who we're following

And to keep another one of this month's trends running, we're celebrating another awesome anonymous #MedTwitter parody account!

Her Twitter handle is @pissedoffpremed, and this is just a small sample of the hilarity, hot-takes, and generally delightful irreverence you'll be signing up for if you follow her (add in stray kitten pics and some very high-quality retweets as well for full effect):

BBMD tip of the week

Watch Tiger King on Netflix if you haven't started already - truth really is stranger than fiction sometimes. You couldn't write more absurd characters if you tried, and the storytelling is incredibly well-done.

Oh, and don't binge it all at once like we almost did - it helps to have something to look forward to.

Quote we're contemplating

“We don’t see things as they are; we see them as we are.” - Anaïs Nin

 
 
 
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PS - If you were forwarded this email and enjoyed it, subscribe here to make sure you don't miss out on future ones!
 
PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds March 21, 2020 - Sisters and side hustles

Posted by BossB, MD on March 21, 2020

What we're reading

For the third weekly installment of our lighthearted, take-a-break-from-the-world and celebrate Women's History Month version of this newsletter, we're headed to Egypt.

You've almost certainly heard of Cleopatra, but have you heard about the other queen of Egypt? Have you heard the story of Cleopatra's 11-year-old sister, who also just so happens to have beat Caesar?

We didn't think so - time to buckle in and hang one cause this one's a wild ride:

Who we're following

And to keep another one of this month's trends running, we're celebrating another hilarious anonymous #MedTwitter parody account! Her Twitter handle is @relatableafmd, and we've gotta say, we agree.

BBMD tip of the week

We've written a few times in this newsletter about general personal finance and the importance of having multiple revenue streams.

It might not seem like it with all of the current economic uncertainty, but right now is a spectacular time, if you're one of the many readers of this newsletter who find themselves homebound, to consider developing your brand and/or building a side-hustle (esp online).

Nobody knows where the market will go in the coming weeks/months. But when volatility strikes and we don't know which investments are good or not, it's helpful to remember that it's always a good time to invest in the one thing you can actually control - yourself.

Here are a few brands we respect the hell out of who've done a great job of this:

This Twitter thread and podcast - both titled "How to Get Rich (without getting lucky)" - are a great place to start.

We're currently working on a webinar about this topic - please let us know if you have any tips you think we should share, any questions you want answered, or any ideas that have worked for you!

Quote we're contemplating

"I'm not a businessman, I'm a business, man" - Shawn Carter (Jay-Z)   

 
 
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PS - If you were forwarded this email and enjoyed it, subscribe here to make sure you don't miss out on future ones!
 
PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds March 14, 2020 - Comedic coping pt 2

Posted by BossB, MD on March 14, 2020

What we're reading

For the second weekly installment of our lighthearted, take-a-break-from-the-world and celebrate Women's History Month version of this newsletter, we're switching continents and turning our eyes to Africa.

In this video, a late-night host heads into the African bush to meet the all-women group of rangers who are protecting animals there. Hilarity ensues, jokes (both good and bad) are told, and inspiration/warm fuzzies abound. Story time!!

Meet the All-Women Group Protecting Animals in Africa from Poachers (again, NSFW and maybe a bit offensive depending on your sensibilities):

 

Who we're following

And to keep another one of last week's trends running, we're celebrating another hilarious anonymous #MedTwitter parody account! This time it's Sass, MD (@mcsassymd), who definitely lives up to her name and then some. You don't have to scroll far to see what we mean:

BBMD tip of the week

This newsletter isn't the only space that we're trying to inject some lightness into right now, and we've stumbled upon a little tactic that's really working for us so we figured we'd share.

We recently saw a funny post saying something along the lines of "wow today was a hard year."

AGREED

Here's just a small sample all of the different sources of info & communication coming at us what feels like every single minute right now:

  • News
  • Investment/market stuff
  • Emails from that yoga place you went to one time 3yrs ago saying they're no longer renting mats but classes are still on
  • Group texts of healthcare ppl that are lighting up all the time (your med school group text, your residency group text, your work group text, etc)
  • Group texts of people for whom you're the resident healthcare person that are lighting up all the time (your family group text, your non-medicine friends group text, etc)

And after a week full of restless, "bzzzzz-bzzzzz"-filled (that's our impression of a phone on silent getting a text, btw) nights, we've implemented a new rule: no screens and no virus talk for at least 1hr before bed.

Taking care of yourself is always of the utmost importance - even more so in times like these when there's so much uncertainty and when many of us may be called upon to step up like never before.

So, set an alarm for an hour or two before your bedtime tonight, hit that "do not disturb" button, and find literally anything else to talk about (or don't talk!) for a while. And please let us know if it makes a difference for you <3

Quote we're contemplating

"Life does not cease to be funny when people die any more than it ceases to be serious when people laugh." – George Bernard Shaw

 
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PS - If you were forwarded this email and enjoyed it, subscribe here to make sure you don't miss out on future ones!
 
PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds March 7, 2020 - Humor is a negotiation superpower

Posted by BossB, MD on March 7, 2020

What we're reading

It's been a rough couple of weeks for the world, and for America especially depending on your politics.

So, for the next week or two we're gonna take a break from our regularly scheduled programming of somewhat serious topics to share a selection of lighthearted and uplifting videos that celebrate Women's History Month! They may be a little more NSFW than you're used to from us, so we recommend headphones if you're around others, or skipping them entirely if you're easily offended. Here's the first:

A Toast to Women Throughout History - Drunk History

Who we're following

On the subject of all things hilarious, one of our favorite Twitter follows is an anonymous parody account - Blair Waldorf, MD (@Jack_and_Diet).

Follow her if you're into hot takes, living vicariously through what sound like a lot of fun yet professionally questionable adventures, cat pictures, and general hilarity/sass.

BBMD tip of the week

Humor isn't just for taking a break or finding a silver lining when things look grim - it is also a negotiation super-power.

See, the #1 emotion we want to avoid during any negotiation - in both ourselves and our counterpart - is defensiveness.

Which can be especially hard to do when things get tense, when subjects get charged, and when a negotiation starts to feel like "me vs them" or a zero-sum game. 

That's where humor comes in. 

See, injecting some humor into a conversation does a few things. It:

  • Humanizes yourself and your counterpart
  • Communicates subtly that you're still engaged in seeking a symbiotic solution
  • Assures your counterpart that there's still goodwill between you
  • Creates space for solutions to be found

So, when you sense tension and negative emotions starting to rise and the emotional resonance with your counterpart starting to dip, here's what you can do:

  • Take a moment - To center your attention on the other person and empathize with how they might be feeling - most people don't like tension & conflict, so if you're feeling some of that they likely are too
  • Assume best intent - Think to yourself "how could an intelligent & loving person come to their conclusion?"
  • Look for an opening - We aren't stand-up comedians or improv comedy instructors, so we can't really teach you "how to be funny." What we do know, however, is that 80% of injecting humor and levity into a conversation is simply awareness - actively looking for an opportunity to do so. Make sure you're laughing at the situation or yourself though, never your counterpart.

As with many things that we teach here at BBMD, practice makes perfect. And if you want to know one of the single most high-impact ways to level up your overall communication abilities and learn to inject humor into conversations (other than taking our curriculum, of course), here it is:

Take an improv comedy class

No, seriously. We mean it. Improv comedy is one of the most effective ways to learn how to listen, how to make others look good in conversation, and how to sensitize yourself to the subtle openings that are constantly being created during any interaction. These classes are offered in most cities of any appreciable size, and we can't recommend taking one enough. It's not just about how to be funny - it's legitimately one of the best tools available to you to actually improve your communication skills in practice rather than just in theory.

Quote we're contemplating

"A good laugh overcomes more difficulties and dissipates more dark clouds than any other one thing." – Laura Ingalls Wilder

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PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds February 29, 2020 - Quiet: The Power of Introverts in A World That Can't Stop Talking

Posted by BossB, MD on February 29, 2020

What we're reading

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in A World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain

If you're reading this, there's at least a 30% chance that you're an introvert (probably higher for this newsletter's subscriber base, tbh), and there's a 100% chance that you know and work closely with one. But what does that mean?

A helluva lot more than "shy," as it turns out.

In this book, the author conducts a 4-part myth-busting and truth-finding journey into the land of introversion:

  • The Extrovert Ideal - A history of how extroversion became the western ideal during the 20th century and how that's affected society over the past hundred or so years
  • Your Biology, Your Self? - A deep dive into the myriad traits that correlate with and comprise our ideas of "introversion" and "extroversion"
  • Do All Cultures Have An Extrovert Ideal? - No, and we can learn a lot about soft power from those that don't
  • How to Love, How to Work - A spectacular summary of how to apply what you've learned

One of the best things about Quiet is that it was written to be interesting to both introverts & extroverts, and the further you are toward either end of the bell curve, the more likely it is that this book will be a great benefit to you.

We'll summarize some of our favorite take-aways from the book in our "tip of the week."

Who we're following

The author of Quiet, Susan Cain (@susancain), has an incredibly well-curated Twitter feed that gives followers a mix of the latest findings from psychologists, little nuggets of wisdom & encouragement, and great content (books, podcasts, videos, etc) recommendations. She's also the founder of The Quiet Revolution, the mission of which is to "unlock the power of introverts for the benefit of us all." We definitely recommend giving her a follow!

BBMD tip of the week

Quiet has a lot of wisdom and applicable advice in its pages - here are just a couple of our favorites:

  • On Negotiations:
    • "Anyone can be a great negotiator... and in fact it often pays to be quiet and gracious, to listen more than talk, and to have an instinct for harmony rather than conflict. With this style, you can take aggressive positions without inflaming your counterpart's ego. And by listening, you can learn what's truly motivating the person you're negotiating with and come up with creative solutions that satisfy both parties."

Sounds to us like a spectacular way to maximize emotional resonance and create an informational advantage!!

  • On Lifestyle Design - specifically navigating career transition and deciding if a position or task is worth "faking it" by sometimes acting more extroverted:
    • "First, think back to what you love to do as a child. How did you answer the question of what you wanted to be when you grew up? The specific answer you gave may have been off the mark, but the underlying impulse was not."
    • "Second, pay attention to the work that you gravitate to."
    • "Finally, pay attention to what you envy. Jealousy is an ugly emotion, but it tells the truth. You mostly envy those who have what you desire."
  • And if you do decide to "fake it" and act more extroverted at times:
    • "...the best way to act out of character is to stay as true to yourself as you possibly can - starting by creating as many 'restorative niches' as possible in your daily life."

Quote we're contemplating

"In her book Anger: The Misunderstood Emotion, Carol Tavris recounts a story about a Bengali cobra that liked to bit passing villagers. One day a swami - a man who has achieved self-mastery - convinces the snake that biting is wrong. The cobra vows to stop immediately, and does. Before long, the village boys grow unafraid of the snake and start to abuse him. Battered and blooded, the snake complains to the swami that this is what came of keeping his promise.

"I told you not to bite," said the swami, "but I did not tell you not to hiss."

- Susan Cain

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PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds February 22, 2020 - Women & Conflict

Posted by BossB, MD on February 22, 2020

Saturday Morning Rounds

A weekly round-up of everything that captured our attention over the last 7 days.

What we're reading

You know that old saying, "when it rains, it pours?"

Well, a number of clients this week have asked us to help them with hard conversations coming up in their near futures - some over job negotiations, some over issues at their existing work, and even one who wanted to strategize and role-play an upcoming conversation in her personal life.

The thread that binds between all of these hard conversations, the thing that makes them hard for most people in the first place, is that they all carry a potential for "conflict."

We're going to focus on that topic as the theme of this week's rounds, and we'd like to start with some research on the differences between how men and women approach interpersonal conflicts.

In an article titled Brief Report: Young Adult Women Resolving Interpersonal Conflicts, the author (Dr. Patricia Flynn Weitzman, PhD, CMC) conducted a "study of social cognition during interpersonal conflict... with 100 young adult women (mean age = 25 years)" in which she surveyed the "nature of the relationship between the participant and the other person (work-based, personal, or impersonal)," then coded their interpersonal negotiation strategies using the following model: 

The author found that:

"Most strategies used (46%) were low-level unilateral strategies, e.g., giving in to the demands of the other person. Most participants reported conflicts at work. These data, taken with other research on young adults' perceived lack of ability at handling conflicts at work, suggest that constructive conflict management programs may be important for young adult women in the school-to-work transition."

In another study titled Women's and Men's Scripts for Interpersonal Conflict, author Judi Beinstein Miller conducted 2 studies.

"In the first, exploratory study, undergraduate women and men wrote scripts for a conflict between two friends over broken promises. In the second, they created scripts for five different types of interpersonal conflicts by selecting from among previously written responses that depict alternative beginnings, middles, and ends to each conflict..."

"Development of the men's scripts depended more on the offended party's initiation of conflict, whereas development of women's scripts depended more on whether the offending party apologized. Results suggest that men may use more personal or independent criteria in representing the management of conflict, whereas women may use more interpersonal or interdependent criteria."

So to summarize, it seems that women in conflict (a) tend to choose low-assertiveness strategies (especially at work), and (b) are less likely than men to initiate conflict, often choosing to do so by apologizing when they do initiate.

And that is likely not a problem, when women are negotiating with other women.

However, when negotiating with men (or with women who are operating under rules and procedures written by men, in a system created by men :/), these strategies will lead to catastrophic results.

The authors of these respective studies, being the good scientists they are, focus far more on describing differences than prescribing solutions, so we'll dive into the latter in our "tip of the week."

Who we're following

Dr. Kate Prior, MBBS (@doctorwibble) is one of our most interesting & exciting follows on Twitter, and just this morning she modeled for all of us what constructive conflict looks like:

If you liked this and want more content like it (and who wouldn't?!), give her a follow!

BBMD tip of the week

While there are definitely gender differences, on average, between how women and men approach conflict, we aren't here to teach you how to:

"<insert anything we teach> like a man"

nor to

"<insert anything we teach> like a woman"

We're here to teach you how to be effective, regardless of whether you identify as masculine, feminine, somewhere in between, or all/none of the above.

So what are the keys to engaging in conflict effectively? 

  • Reframe - Your relationship with conflict and your expectations going into one
  • Own - The emotional state, or "frame," of the conversation
  • Seek to Understand - Your counterpart's values, priorities, emotions, and goals
  • Assert - Yourself, your values, your priorities, your emotions, and your goals
  • Persist - Toward either (a) a solution that's acceptable to all parties, or (b) the conclusion that no such solution is possible

The first and most important step of this process is reframing.

When most people think of conflict, they associate "damage" as an inevitable result. However, conflict is defined by us simply as "a state of mismatched or competing goals."

When we understand that conflict doesn't have to involve any kind of damage, relational or otherwise, it frees us to see conflict for what it truly is - the state in which the real progress and growth, in any relationship, occurs.

Conflict has the potential to be productive or destructive, pleasant or painful, and which side of the spectrum it ends up on relies largely upon your expectations going in.

Okay, so now you've developed a positive personal relationship with conflict - congrats! But what about your counterpart? What if they're not on the same page? The fact of the matter is that you cannot control whomever you're engaging with, so it's on YOU own the emotional frame of the conversation, regardless of your counterpart's actions.

If things are pleasant and productive, that doesn't take a whole lot of effort.

However, when you feel the emotional resonance between you and your counterpart start to dip, when you sense that emotions are becoming negatively charged, it's your job to take ownership in that moment and steer the ship toward smoother waters.

Don't worry though, there's a little thought exercise you can use to help control the situation. Whenever you see someone start to get worked up, when you see that their emotions are beginning to control them instead of the other way around, imagine that they *poof* just turned into a toddler throwing a temper tantrum. It'll enable you to maintain:

  • Empathy for your counterpart - they're just a toddler after all!
  • Control over yourself - it's a lot easier to react adaptively when you don't view your counterpart's negative emotional swings as a threat
  • Levity - A sense of humor and lightness is key to moving past the moment of conflict without your counterpart losing face; graciousness wins here

Once you've reframed and owned the conflict, the rest is honestly downhill from there.

Lean into empathy, first seeking to understand your counterpart's position. This will make them feel heard and valued, while also providing you an informational advantage.

Next, assert your own position. We use the term "assert" very intentionally - assertiveness is the midpoint on the line between weakness and aggressiveness, so make sure that your statements cannot be misunderstood as either weak or aggressive, and you're doing it! Simply state your points in a pleasant yet matter-of-fact tone, and let silence do the work from there.

Lastly, engage the entire time with a sense of certainty that you'll either reach a mutually beneficial agreement, or you'll discover that no such solution is possible. When we persist forward toward a solution with an understanding that the "worst case" won't occur unless it's already inevitable before we've started (ie we'll leave no stone unturned in our seeking for a solution), it "takes the sting out" of the conversation and removes fear from the equation, allowing us to move more freely and effectively.

Oh and by the way, PRACTICE THIS STUFF BEFORE IT COUNTS!!!

This is all a lot easier said than done, and you don't want to be caught trying to remember these steps in your head for the first time during one of the most important negotiations of your life.

Which is exactly why our curriculum is structured in such a way that you get to:

  • Learn about the theory
  • Practice using role-play scenarios and other activities
  • Watch us deliver a model response/example
  • Practice again until you have your own version of "perfect" down pat

Quote we're contemplating

"Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself." - Rumi

 
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PS - If you were forwarded this email and enjoyed it,  subscribe here to make sure you don't miss out on future ones!
 
PPS - As always, please let us know your requests and suggestions by replying to this email (we read 'em all) or getting at us via Twitter. Which section above is your favorite? What do you want more or less of? Just send a tweet to  @BossB_MD and put #SaturdayMorningRounds in there so we can find it.

Have a wonderful weekend, y'all!
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Saturday Morning Rounds February 15, 2020 - Celebrating the kinetic Dr. Kemi Doll

Posted by BossB, MD on February 15, 2020

Saturday Morning Rounds

A weekly round-up of everything that captured our attention over the last 7 days.

What we're reading

This week's newsletter will be a bit different from what you're used to.

See, we recently had the joy of getting to know Dr. Kemi Doll, MD, MS. She's a:

  • Gynecological Oncologist
  • Researcher
  • Non-profit founder
  • Coach for women of color in academic medicine

What's more, she's created an already-great and continually growing library of content on lifestyle design & career management that everyone should know about.

And given that it's currently Black History Month in the states, it's only natural that we would take this opportunity to celebrate her and her work, and make sure that a few more people know about it. So let's dig in!

In this week's "what we're reading" section, we're going to highlight Dr. Doll's newsletter. Here's a sample in which she breaks down the 3 career roles we all need to integrate into our professional identities and split our time between:

  • Worker Bee - Gets sh*t done. Lit searches, clinic follow up, data dictionaries, student lectures, etc.

  • Scientist - Ideas, ideas, ideas. Collaborations, adapting new concepts, light-bulb moments.

  • CEO - The boss, the decider, the planner, the accountability manager.

The newsletter is concise and impactful, so rather than give away the punch line of how you can improve your orientation toward those 3 roles, we'll encourage you to take a couple minutes and go straight to the source!

Who we're following

Obviously we're following Dr. Kemi Doll (@KemiDoll)!

What might not be so obvious, however, is that Dr. Doll's Twitter feed is how we first found out about her. See, her writing talents aren't limited to grants and newsletters - she seems to have mastered the art of the Twitter thread as well.

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